Alumnae Spotlight of the Month

List of 5 news stories.

  • November Alumnae Spotlight, 2019 Distinguished Alumna, Ola Morgan Becnel '51

    Ola Morgan Becnel 1951 has been chosen by the Ursuline Alumnae Association of New Orleans, with the approval of the Academy President and the Ursuline Sisters, to be the 2019 Ursuline Distinguished Alumna. This award, granted to Ola Becnel posthumously, is annually bestowed upon a graduate of Ursuline Academy or Ursuline College of New Orleans who demonstrates the core values and ideals of an Ursuline education in all aspects of her life. Since 1986, 51 women have received this honor, making it one of Ursuline’s most prestigious awards.
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  • October Alumnae Spotlight, Maria Weidenbacher, Sioux of 2005, Director of Alumnae

    In what ways did your Ursuline education prepare you for the work you’re doing now?

    Ursuline taught me to lead when I was shy, to try new things even when I was unsure, to not give up if I fell short, and to seek out a friend in every person. I started Ursuline knowing barely anyone and it was a rough transition in that sense, but I left with lifelong friendships and so much confidence. I owe it to Ursuline and the incredibly encouraging students, teachers, and staff for instilling that confidence in me. I believe these qualities will serve me well in my new role as Director of Alumnae Relations. I want to help grow that sense of pride and confidence that each Ursuline girl has when she leaves State Street and enters the world. I want to start new traditions and get more alumnae back on campus to feel the warmth that only Ursuline can provide. Lastly, I want to get to know each and every one of you so I can help you and your classmates and you can help Ursuline.
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  • September Alumnae Spotlight, Jalan Richardson, Sioux of 2011

    In what ways did your Ursuline education prepare you for the work you’re doing now?

    At Ursuline, I found my love for science. It was in my 7th grade science class that I found experimenting and working to answer questions fun. That love of science was further solidified in my high school Chemistry class with Ms. Harney. Here is where I decided to major in Chemistry upon graduation in 2011. While attending Hampton University, I concentrated on forensic chemistry but was unaware of what was to come next. I thought back to a time in high school where I volunteered to teach Catechism classes and the joy I received in working with kids. This led to my decision to become a teacher back in my hometown. Ursuline not only gave me a love of science but by instilling Serviam, helped me recognize my love of teaching.
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  • August Alumnae Spotlight, Suzanne Dorsey Heidel, Mac of 1985, High School Dean of Students

    In what ways did your Ursuline education prepare you for the work you’re doing now?
     
    Like so many others, living the Serviam motto became a major element of my profession. I have served Catholic high school girls in various roles, always incorporating community outreach and service learning. Serviam, “I will serve” is a mandate. It does not suggest, recommend or encourage service. Serviam reminds us all that we have both an inherent desire to serve our world and an obligation to do so. I remember my high school senior service project vividly. It was an eye opening experience working with young deaf children. I felt so far out of my element, but the wisdom of St. Angela teaches Ursuline graduates that you must ACT anyway - even if it feels awkward or calls for all of your courage, or in the case of St. Angela, even if you are beginning work at age 61. I acknowledge that for students, serving others can sometimes be messy, even scary, but when the risk is joined to prayer, the experience is always reciprocal, reminding us that we are all responsible for one another and are one family and therein rewarding us by bringing us closer to one another and to God.
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  • July Alumnae Spotlight, Kimberlin Pittman Brown, Skip of 1995

    In what ways did your Ursuline education prepare you for the work you’re doing now? 
     
    My Ursuline education is something that I reflect on regularly. I work in healthcare and am often having to be the decision-maker with processes or the implementation of new initiatives. As I have advanced in my career, Ursuline prepared me to stay humble and stay hungry. Humility allows me to always try to understand the needs of others and seek out ways to do good for all, and not just because it may benefit me or someone I am around. As a nurse, I encounter people from all walks of life and various socio-economic backgrounds. My Ursuline background allows me to see the entire person and their family and not treat them as just another patient. Hungry, not in the sense of looking for physical food, but hunger for me is wanting to learn more, wanting to do more, and the drive to understand cultures and communities and how to best serve them. Whether we are talking about healthcare disparities or the opioid epidemic that is affecting everyone to some degree, I am hungry to help make a change by educating and empowering families to live better lives that are rich in quality and seek out help when they are sick, whether physically, mentally or emotionally. Mental and emotional fitness/wellness is equally as important as taking care of your heart. And we have to embrace and encourage each other to do this and offer support. We all need each other and we need to eliminate topics being taboo--if it affects your life or your family's life. We need to have a safe circle or village to help walk with us during the trying times.
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