Alumnae Spotlight of the Month

List of 5 news stories.

  • August Alumnae Spotlight, Abigail Price, Sioux of 2020

    Abigail Price '20 was selected as the 2020 Cor Unum Award Recipient by the Ursuline Alumnae Association. The award is given to one senior each year. Candidates are judged soley on their love for Ursuline Academy and their honest expression of what the Academy means to them. Read Abigail's winning essay below. 

    What does it mean to you to be in the 293rd graduating class of Ursuline Academy of New Orleans?

    I have been at Ursuline Academy for more than half of my life. To say that I will be graduating in May 2020 is one of the most surreal things after having been at the same school since I was three. To me, being in the 293rd graduating class means more than I could ever put into words. For one, it means that from May 16th and onward with the rest of my life I will be responsible for carrying out and displaying the values that Ursuline has instilled in me since day one. It also means that I will be continuing the legacy of graduating from Ursuline as have 5 other women in my family and I’m sure many more will in the coming years. Knowing that I will soon be an alumnae of the 293rd graduating class of this wonderful institution is one of the most amazing things that has ever come to be thus far in my life and I will never be able to thank all of the family, teachers, administration members, and those on the Board for helping me come so far in my life and reach the goals I have which were all made possible through this amazing school.



    Read More
  • July Alumnae Spotlight, Dr. Margarita O'Byrne Curtis '69

    In what ways did your Ursuline education prepare you for the work you’re doing now?  
     
    At Ursuline I learned that there are no shortcuts to excellence or truth-seeking. Instead, both of these aspirations require a patient, deliberate, cumulative approach and the acceptance that the search never ends. As an educator, it is important to model discipline and hard work as prerequisites of superior performance, regardless of the field of study, and to remind young people that no matter how intelligent or naturally talented they may be, these gifts are not enough. A commitment to continual growth and improvement is what leads to a high level of achievement and fulfillment. When I entered Ursuline, I barely spoke English, and for a while, I thought I would not pass my courses, except Algebra, which was the only “language” I understood. The sisters did not lower the standards or the workload for me, but did something much more valuable: they helped me understand that consistent effort and perseverance would yield good results. In their wise, understated way, they also made me feel that they believed in me. At the end of 9th grade, I did pass all my courses, but more importantly, I understood that challenging goals are attained by many small, incremental steps. The blend of rigor and support I encountered at the Academy--and the belief that excellence is the byproduct of focused discipline—is what I have tried to offer my students in my career as an educator.
    Read More
  • June Alumnae Spotlight, Kimberly Reese, Merry Mac of 1991

    In what ways did your Ursuline education prepare you for the work you’re doing now?

    As the Assistant Vice President of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving at Xavier University of Louisiana effective communication is paramount. It is my job as the liaison for alumni and a senior level fundraiser to tell the Xavier story in a way that speaks to both the head and the heart. I have to make the case for Xavier University everyday through various forms of narrative. It was at Ursuline where I received the foundation of communication, both written and verbal. I recall short papers and term papers being the foundation of English class at Ursuline. I can specifically, recall my junior year and the tremendous amount time spent on comma splices and the appropriate use of commas and semicolons. During my senior year, we were required to write letters to the military serving in the Gulf War. Little did I know that my pen pal class assignment would also contribute to my ability to communicate with alumni and donors in a more personal style. I have to admit one of the highlights of my day, was attending speech and drama classes. Mrs. Nolan was so much fun and very informative. Her lessons on proper pronunciation and articulation would certainly benefit me in the dozens of speeches and appeals I make annually.
    Read More
  • May Alumnae Spotlight, Danielle Brandt, Sioux of 2005

    In what ways did your Ursuline education prepare you for the work you’re doing now?

    One of the most important things I learned at Ursuline was curiosity, a questioning attitude and teamwork. I remember researching science projects with teammates and discovering cause and effect. If something didn’t work the first time, we were encouraged to try again to develop a solution. These problem solving skills and ability to compromise and be open to input have served me well as a leader in the ever-changing military environment. I was also fortunate to have teachers who saw my potential and fostered that growth. No dream was too big. I remember getting my first manual camera, a K1000 Pentax, from my French teacher Ms. Hooper and her writing in my yearbook that she couldn’t wait to see my photographs in Time Magazine one day. That seemed so unlikely to me at the age of 16 but just a few years after joining the military, my photograph was picked up by Time for a piece on U.S. and Chinese relations. The French I learned also came in handy while living in Belgium where they spoke French in the region. We were encouraged to be ambassadors and today I have lived in Japan, Bahrain, and Belgium representing our country and documenting historic events such as Montenegro’s addition to the NATO alliance. Above all, Ursuline’s motto of Serviam has influenced me throughout my life in choosing to serve and defend my country, my community, and my current career field of military counseling.
    Read More
  • April Alumnae Spotlight, Judy Abel-Alexander Thornton, Skipperette of 1959

    In what ways did your Ursuline education prepare you for the work you’re doing now?

    My Ursuline education prepared me for life. I’m retired. At present, I am a volunteer at Charity Guild of Catholic Women. This is an organization that raises money for underprivileged children in Harris County (greater Houston Area). I have been an active member for the past 28 years. I am also a Stephen Minister. Stephen Ministers are Christian men and women trained to provide one-to-one care to people experiencing a difficult time in life, such as grief, divorce, job loss, chronic or terminal illness,etc. I am a trained and active facilitator for a grief workshop - Walking the Mourner's Path.
    Read More
Archive